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See how your favorite candy bar wrappers evolved over the decades

What did a Baby Ruth look like when you were a kid?

There must be a million ways to combine chocolate, nougat, caramel and nuts. Not to mention coconut and crisped rice. It's no wonder there have been so many different candy bars throughout the years. Some treats and confectioners, from the Chicken Dinner Bar to the Reggie Bar, have gone extinct, while other candy bars have become American institutions. 

Some of these names date back to the Great Depression and beyond. Let's take a look at the evolution of a handful of popular candy bars made by the big three — Hershey, Mars and Nestle. 

Which wrappers do you fondly recall? What is your favorite?

Almond Joy

The divisive coconut bar originally made by Peter Paul has gradually gone more tropical in its packaging.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Hershey

Baby Ruth

It was originally called the Kandy Kake, but the Curtiss Candy Company refashioned the nutty bar in 1921. Years later, it would become a favorite of Chunk in The Goonies.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Nestle

Butterfinger

Once billed as a "chocolate honeycomb," the Butterfinger has stayed true to its color scheme.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Nestle

Hershey's

The American classic has long been a "nourishing food."

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Hershey

Kit Kat

Born in the United Kingdom, the Kit Kat has spread around the globe. We may not have as many flavors as Japan, but the original works just fine.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Hershey

Krackel

The Halloween favorite (in its mini variety) once contained toasted peanuts and "oven popped rice." Ooh, ovens! Fancy!

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Hershey

Mars

The namesake bar of the Mars company actually went away for a while in the States. It's back as of this decade, thankfully.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Mars

PayDay

Few candy bars have fiddled with their description. PayDay has dubbed itself a "salted nut roll," "salted nut bar," "peanut bar" and "peanut caramel bar."

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Hershey

Snickers

These days, with its new marketing campaign, it's hard to find a Snickers bar that actually says "Snickers."

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Mars

3 Musketeers

Why the name? It was once three bars — chocolate, strawberry and vanilla — packaged together. They should bring back that Neapolitan style.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Mars

Twix

The relative newcomer in the bunch, Twix hit our shores in 1979, and only dates back to 1967.

Images: Collecting Candy / Candy Wrapper Archive / Mars

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