Willard Scott originated the Ronald McDonald character

He also played Bozo the Clown.

The Everett Collection

Like McDonald's, Bozo the Clown is a franchise. Pinto Colvig was the first fellow to play the character, shortly after World War II ended. The clown was used as a mascot for Capitol Records before making his television debut in 1949. A few years later, Larry Harmon bought the rights to Bozo, and began playing the clown on a syndicated series called Bozo: The World's Most Famous Clown.

But Bob Bell is likely the man in the makeup that comes to your mind when you think Bozo. Harmon began licensing the Bozo character to location stations across the country (and, eventually, the world). Bell slipped into the giant red shoes for WGN in Chicago, and his Bozo's Circus became the most widely watched Bozo show in the land. You know, with Cooky and "The Grand Prize Game" of buckets.

Other cities had their Bozos. Frank Avruch in Boston… and Willard Scott in Washington, D.C.

Scott will forever be known for wishing happy birthday (along with Smucker's) to centenarians on The Today Show. However, he got his start in clowning.

Scott's role as Bozo in our nation's capital led directly into the creation of another iconic clown. In the early 1960s, the future weatherman came up with the character Ronald McDonald, the "Hamburger-Happy Clown." Ronald popped up in three ads in the D.C. area, the first-ever to feature Ronald.

The Everett CollectionScott as Bozo the Clown

"There was something about the combination of hamburgers and Bozo that was irresistible to kids," Scott told the Food Network in 2008. "That's why when Bozo went off the air a few years later, the local McDonald's people asked me to come up with a new character to take Bozo's place. So, I sat down and created Ronald McDonald."

Now, this early iteration of Ronald would likely look unfamiliar — if not strange — to modern kids. In his first ad, he had a paper beverage cup over his nose and a box with a combo meal atop his head. He wore a costume of yellow and red vertical stripes. However, he would eventually adopt the look of the more familiar garb — wide red grin, yellow vest, etc. — after Ronald received a makeover in 1966 courtesy of Michael Polakovs, a.k.a. circus legend Coco the Clown. Polakovs became the public face of Ronald, though Scott would continue to dress up as the burger-loving clown for D.C. TV.

Later in life, Scott became more associated with jellies and jams. But let's not forget he had fries with that.

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PDCougar 1 month ago
Willard Scot's quote in the article in which he appears to claim to be the creator of Ronald McDonald is a claim that is inaccurate. Ronald McDonald was created by a guy named Frank Hough (pronounced "huff") while he was enrolled in an economics analysis fellowship and had been hired as one of Ray Kroc's first full-time employees. During a meeting in 1963, Hough came up with the concept of Ronald McDonald as a way to market McDonald's as a restaurant that would appeal to families. Frank later became a business professor and (for a while) the president at Graceland College in Lamoni, Iowa, and students were circulating the story for years about how Hough had been involved in creating Ronald McDonald.

When I was writing the centennial history of Graceland College (published in 1997), I got Frank to finally go on the record and give the details about this longtime campus rumor. Frank was very hesitant when I asked him to do this, explaining that he had always been low key about that story and his role in creating that iconic restaurant figure. But then Frank decided over the course of the call that it was important to let all the facts be known, in connection with this project about the college's centennial. I'm pretty sure Frank's exact words to me over the phone as he related the origin of Ronald McDonald was that he told the people during that McDonald's leadership meeting back in 1963: "Well, families have kids, and kids like clowns. Why don't you create a clown and call him 'Ronald McDonald'?" Frank also said at the time that he had received regular payments from McDonald's for coming up with the character.

Hough died of MS in 2014 at the age of 74. Outside of the standard obituary, the passing of the person who created Ronald McDonald was completely overlooked by anyone in the media.

Details of Frank Hough's Ronald McDonald story were written in the "Biographies" section of "The Graceland College Book of Knowledge." Use the online link below, and go to numbered-page 417 (or PDF page 427) for what is probably the most extensive account (as short as it is) about the origin of Ronald McDonald:

https://my.graceland.edu/ICS/Resources/Communications/The_Graceland_Identity.jnz?portlet=Free-form_Content_2014-01-16T10-59-46-622
Moverfan 2 months ago
Born and raised in southeastern Michigan and I remember watching Bozo on channel 9, which was the Canadian Broadcast System (also great children's shows like The Friendly Giant and Mr. Dressup). We got to go over to Windsor at least once and be in the audience--may have been with my Brownie troop, but I'm not sure.
MrsPhilHarris 2 months ago
I am not a fan of clowns.
Then, obviously, this lyric quote would not apply to you: "Be a clown, be a clown. All the world loves a clown...." Or this song title: "Send In The Clowns."
I quite like "Send in the Clowns."

It certainly applied to certain presidential administrations.

''...don't bother, they're here."
LoveMETV22 2 months ago
According to Larry Harmon Pictures Corp., 183 people played Bozo in cities all over the world.
That's a lot of Bozo's
There's more than that, in Washington D.C.!
texasluva LoveMETV22 2 months ago
Older clowns did not bother me. After Killer Klowns From Outer Space (I showed that awhile back, a year or so) they did. Then came IT and bunch of others and I am not watching. Jokers are okay though. Circus and evil type clowns are OUT .
LoveMETV22 texasluva 2 months ago
Yes, and there a lot of clown based movies, unfortunately most evil. Guess there's no profit in good clowns, that went by the wayside after Bozo ended.
harlow1313 2 months ago
I just don't have much admiration for the advertising world.

At the circus, I liked clowns on stilts. "Killer Klowns from Outer-space" is watchable. Otherwise, I have no use for clowns.
justjeff 2 months ago
The dyed-red yak hair wig shown for Williard Scott was the closest resembling Alan Livingston's creation of "Bozo, the Capitol Clown " for Capitol Records, and looked great.

If you go onto YouTube and search for Bozo the Clown, you'll see many of the TV Bozos with wider, taller, wilder and even droopier hair. It seems that Larry Harmon (at one point) either sought a change for the character's looks or just didn't enforce his standards that strongly, as long as he received his licensing fees...

Even Bob Bell [beloved to the Chicago market] had for a time wore a red suit instead of the standard blue one...
stephaniestavr5 justjeff 2 months ago
Yes he did wear a red suit. He wore it in the '60's. That's the one he was wearing when I saw him. All these years later, I still can't believe I was one of the fortunate ones to see BC in person. I think the only reason[obviously,] is because it was so popular and tickets were hard to get. Oh, and also, to me this falls under the category of something that happens to someone else, but not you. Like me seeing Neil Diamond and all 4 Monkees. Ahh... memories....
justjeff stephaniestavr5 2 months ago
...especially since Neil Diamond wrote two of the Monkees' biggest hits... "I'm a Believer" and "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You"...
Moriyah 2 months ago
Thank God Gomer never dressed as neither one of those mascots! However, there was an episode where he did dress up as one of them creepy crappy things (clowns). Who agrees with me on all of that? (Let me know)
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stephaniestavr5 Moriyah 2 months ago
Of course I know. The population was only around 17,000. The place is considered a village, due to its size.
Moriyah MrsPhilHarris 2 months ago
Who's Perriot?
MrsPhilHarris Moriyah 2 months ago
He is a French clown. He is friend with Pierette and Columbine. If you look at Gomer, the costume he is wearing is Perriot’s.
Moriyah MrsPhilHarris 2 months ago
I just looked it up, and you're right. He did look like Pierrot
Michael 2 months ago
I thought he did weather on the.Today Show. The birthday greetings was secondary.


I don't suppose Larry Harmon is related to Mark, or Tracy Nelson's mother.
daDoctah Michael 2 months ago
Apart from Bozo, Harmon is best known for trying to franchise Laurel and Hardy as cartoon characters.
ncadams27 2 months ago
So Willard Scott played a clown in Washington. Some might argue he wasn’t the only one.
justjeff ncadams27 2 months ago
Yeah, but the others weren't *playing*!
LoveMETV22 2 months ago
RIP Willard Scott. Thank you for your role as Bozo the Clown , and your inspiration for Ronald McDonald.
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