5 Julia Child recipes that will make you say, ''Bon appétit!''

''Find something you're passionate about and keep tremendously interested in it!''

How do you begin to describe the impact of a person like Julia Child? Born in Pasadena, California, Child didn't pick up her first spatula until 1948, well into her marriage with Paul Cushing Child. The two were relocated to Paris when Paul was assigned there as an exhibits officer for the United States Information Agency. 

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After her first meal, Child was hooked on the art of French cooking and enrolled in the infamous Cordon Bleu cooking school to find out just what made the cuisine so darn delicious. Years of learning, publishing and cooking later, Child is still an inspiration to home cooks everywhere. 

Her fearless nature and positive attitude made her an infectious spirit amongst both chefs and home cooks alike. The only way to learn to cook, after all, is to cook. During one episode that involved a few kitchen tricks, Child mused, "See, when I flipped it, I didn’t have the courage to do it the way I should’ve. But you can always pick it up, and if you’re alone in the kitchen, who is going to see? But the only way you learn how to flip things is just to flip them."

Here are some of her most famous recipes that chefs today still like to tackle. Bon appétit 

1. Boeuf Bourguignon (Beef Stew)

One of her most famous recipes, this sultry beef stew is chock full of veggies and large pieces of tender beef, certain to warm you up on a chilly day. Child combined chuck roast with carrots, onions, mushrooms and bacon. Combining in a dutch oven, she simmered these ingrediants in a stock made from red wine, beef stock, tomato paste, flour and, of course, butter. This dish is still a classic go-to slow cook recipe for many people, and with the innovation of the Instapot and crock pots, it's easier than ever to give this tasty dish a try at home!

To replicate, see this recipe.

2. Potage Parmentier (Potato and Leek Soup)

This oh-so-smooth soup was a personal favorite for Child! A creamy dish made with potatoes, leeks, plenty of cream and herbs this satisfying dish can be served warm or cool. The real trick to this? Don't over-blend your mixture! By pureeing the mix until just smooth, you will prevent the potatoes from becoming gluey and unpleasantly thick, maintaining the delightful texture of a smooth puree. A tip directly from Child; use am immersion blender to gauge your puree. It's easier to keep an eye on than a regular blender. 

To replicate, see this recipe.

3. Sole Meunière

This French classic is thought to be the first thing that Child consumed when she arrived in Paris with husband Paul Child. She described the experience in her book My Life in France, written by Child with Alex Prud'homme. Child writes, "After consulting the waiter, Pail had decided to order sole meunière… perfectly browned in a sputtering butter sauce with a sprinkling of chopped parsle on top. I lifted a forkful of fish to my mouth, took a bite, and chewed slowly. The flesh of the sole was delicate, with a light but distinct taste of the ocean that blended marvelously with the browned butter. It was a morself of perfection."

To replicate, see this recipe

4. Soupe à l'oignon (French Onion Soup)

This dish can be found in restaurants across the world. There may not be anything better than the gooey cheese or the savory broth of homemade French onion soup. What makes this recipe so special is the care and attention that the onions need in order to bring out their full caramalized flavor. Thinly-sliced onions are covered and cooked slowly, drawing out the natural sugars in the vegetable. A unique twist the Child uses? Grating raw onion into the soup before broiling the bread and cheese on top! This gives a deep and rich soup some brightness, making it a delightful treat. 

To replicate, see this recipe.

5. Cherry Clafoutis

Don't forget about dessert! Pronounced kla-foo-TEE, this French version of a flan can be made with any kind of fruit the baker desires, but Child loved the version that used whole, pitted cherries. Using the same batter throughout, this dessert is baked in two layers, giving this crustless dessert a unique texture and double the custard goodness. In your baking tin, bake about one inch of batter until a film just sets on the top of the layer. Add your pitted cherries, spreading evenly, and then top with the rest of the batter. Bake the clafoutis until golden and puffy, and serve with coffee. A delicious, easy dessert that holds up throughout the year!

To replicate, see this recipe

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