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11 classic candies introduced in the 1960s

Those were some sweet and sour times.

Image: Envisioning the American Dream

The 1960s were a candy-colored decade. Rooms were decorated with bright red and orange chairs that looked carved out of bubblegum and coated with M&Ms shell. There were lemon-yellow mini skirts, candy-apple Mustangs and lime-green lamps. 

It's no wonder so many popular fruit-flavored candies were born in the decade. What a time to be a trick-or-treater. 

Here are 11 popular candies that first hit the market in the Swingin' Sixties. Which is your favorite?

1

Starburst

1960

Starburst wall clocks were all the rage in midcentury interior design. Perhaps that is what inspired the name of this popular chew. A man in England won £5 in a contest to name the new Mars candy. Well, that would afford him a few packs, at least.

Image: Mars / Jason Liebig courtesy of Collecting Candy

2

Swedish Fish

Circa 1960

It's surprisingly difficult to pinpoint when exactly these red fish were introduced to the American public, but it was around the dawn of the decade. The gummies are indeed Swedish, designed for the North American market. Today, more than 7,000 metric tons of Swedish Fish are produced annually.

Image: Thinkstock

3

Lemonheads

1962

Chicago's Ferrara Candy Company introduced these sour little orbs after founder Salvatore Ferrara noted the oblong shape of his grandson's head. 

Image: Jason Liebig courtesy of Collecting Candy

4

Now & Laters

1962

Dentists likely had mixed feelings about this sticky, taffy-like treat. The original slogan proclaimed, "Eat Some Now, Kid." Just look at all the flavors once on offer — banana, wild cherry, cinnamon, watermelon, chocolate…

Image: Jason Liebig courtesy of Collecting Candy

5

Astro Pops

1963

Of course the space race would influece the snacking habits of American youth. We all wanted to be astronauts.

Image: magazinesandbooks.com

6

Cadbury Creme Eggs

1963

Before becoming an Easter staple, the gooey, chocolately British sweets were first known as Fry's Creme Eggs. Last year, the manufacturer announced a change in the recipe, which nearly led to riots in England.

Image: doyouremember.co.uk

7

SweeTarts

1963

Joseph Fish Smith invented these after hearing complaints from parents that Pixy Stix were too messy. The formula is essentially the same, merely pressed into round tablets. 

Image: Jason Liebig courtesy of Collecting Candy / Flickr

8

100 Grand Bar

1966

It used to be known as the $100,00 Bar. In the mid '80s, Nestlé switched the name over to "100 Grand" to revamp the brand. At least they didn't adjust it for inflation.

SEE MORE: 9 RICH FACTS ABOUT THE 100 GRAND BAR

Image: Jason Liebig courtesy of Collecting Candy

9

Razzles

1966

Do you remember the jingle? "First it's a candy, then it's a gum. Little round Razzles are so much fun." Originally, they were merely raspberry flavored, hence the name. In the modern age of a million varieties, you can chew on Blaze'n Blueberry, Gushin' Grape, Strawberry-Bana and so many other made-up fruit flavors.

SEE MORE: 8 POPULAR SNACK FOODS THAT TURNED 50 YEARS OLD THIS YEAR

Image: Dan Goodsell / The Imaginary World and Jason Liebig / Collecting Candy

10

Zotz

1968

The sour bombs trace their origin back to Italy. That sour burst would radically change the candy industry. A couple decades later, kids couldn't get enough of extremely sour tongue assaults like Warheads.

Image: Candy Warehouse

11

Fruit Stripe Gum

1969

Its flavor may have lasted less time than the latest Archies single, but this nifty colored gum quickly became a favorite. The unique stripe pattern certainly helped. Beech-Nut originally produced the chewing gum, but it is now produced by Ferrara.

Image: Cherry House Quilts

SEE ALSO: 15 CANDIES BORN IN THE 1950s

Let's rewind the clock for some Atomic Fireballs and Fizzies. READ MORE

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