New statue honoring Leonard Nimoy announced in Boston

The news comes on what would have been Nimoy's 90th birthday

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On what would have been the actor's 90th birthday, the Museum of Science in Boston has announced a statue honoring Leonard Nimoy and his legacy.

The 20-foot, stainless steel monument will be in the shape of the Vulcan ta'al — known more commonly as the Vulcan salute that accompanies "live long and prosper" — and will stand outside of the Museum of Science. 

Startrek.comRendition of the complete statue

"The 'Live Long and Prosper' symbol represents a message that my dad believed so strongly in," Julie Nimoy, Leonard Nimoy's daughter, said about the news. "The sculpture not only depicts one of the world’s most recognized and loved gestures for peace, tolerance, and diversity, but it will also be a beautiful tribute to my dad's life and legacy."

The announcement of the statue comes in the same week that the city of Boston officially made March 26 "Leonard Nimoy Day".

This is not the first time Nimoy has been featured by the museum. In the 1980s, Nimoy, who was born just blocks from the museum, recorded an introduction for the museum's theater that has been heard for three decades now. 

"He lifted our aspirations and hopes through his commitment to science, intellectual curiosity, generosity, and, yes, logic," said museum president Tim Ritchie. "The opportunity to pay tribute to him is a great honor and what better day to make this announcement than on what would have been his 90th birthday.”

The next steps for the statue include finalizing site planning, fundraising, and the actual construction. 

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MMitchellMarmel 1 month ago
Personally, I think the idea of a 20 foot tall Hebrew benediction is nifty! ;-)
Pacificsun 6 months ago
Not a bad legacy for an actor who's first book on the subject was titled "I Am Not Spock." Kind of makes you wonder. Should more tribute go to Gene Roddenberry for putting all the pieces together to bring Spock about. Or to Mr. Nimoy for bringing Spock to life! No matter. It often takes a village to get anything done. In this case we're fortunate to have benefitted from the result!
Hogansucks1 6 months ago
He was the science officer on the Enterprise-this was the perfect tribute to Leonard. To each his/her own opinion, but why can’t people just be happy for him!! ‘HUMANS’ 🧐
stephaniestavropoulos 6 months ago
I can see many photo ops next to the statue, imitating the Vulcan peace symbol. One person who I wouldn't be surprised to show up for a photo op. is fellow nonagenarian, and shipmate, William Shatner. Just don't expect to see him doing the Vulcan Salute, as if I remember reading right, he can't do it. But, I do seem to recall someone not being able to, {I want to say it was the Vulcan leader-that right? She was seen in the ep. "Pon Far." The actress couldn't do it either, so she had her fingers taped into the salute. Maybe that's what WS will do. Mr. Shatner and I have something in common, I can't do the salute either. I am not a huge fan of him acting wise, {he is obviously good, otherwise he wouldn't have kept on getting acting roles.}But I do like him for the fact that I stated: he can't do the salute! When I found that out, that changed my opinion about him!
P.S.
I am now expecting/anticipating a bunch of you to download selphies of your hands in the Vulcan Ta'al! "Live long and prosper."
Left hand or right hand? (Oh, BTW it was "Amok Time". And Celia Lovsky was the actress who played "T'Pau, of Vulcan... The only person to ever turn down a seat on the Federation Council")
Pacificsun CaptainDunsel 6 months ago
And her fingers were sticky-glued, not taped.
The episode you are mentioning was called " Amok Time" the mating cycle was called Pon Far.
madvincent 6 months ago
That looks too creepy and many young kids who go there on field trips will have no idea who or what it means...
Maybe a better place would be across the Charles river and put it on the M.I.T. campus..... just a thought
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Pacificsun madvincent 6 months ago
In terms of a teachable moment, maybe kids will ask about it. Now if the teachers (20 years older than them) don't know, then shame on them. But it's positive symbol and thought. And heaven knows peace and tolerance and diversity are certainly in fashion now.
Pacificsun MrsPhilHarris 6 months ago
Well said, as you always do, MPH! Thank you!
MrsPhilHarris Pacificsun 6 months ago
Lol. I never did understand taking photos in front of statue, etc. I look back at old snapshots of myself and rarely was I in front of anything like that. Usually sitting at at a table🍹or in a jungle🐍 or on a desert. 🐪
Hogansucks1 6 months ago
Very nice tribute and gesture to Leonard, his family ,and fans! Much deserved- Thanks Leonard 🖖. “(Are you sure it’s not time for a Colorful metaphor)”. 😁
The only "colorful metaphor" I can think of is the one a certain Frog made famous: "It's not that easy being green." Would this count as an appropriate "colorful metaphor" for a Vulcan? The quote refers to, {obviously,} how verdant a Frog's skin is. But when attached to Vulcans as you know, it refers to what courses through their veins. I tried!
harlow1313 6 months ago
While I enjoy outdoor art, I am not a fan of statuary that celebrates fictional or non-fictional characters. I prefer something more representative of humankind.
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What's just like gomer pyle?
Pacificsun CaptainDunsel 6 months ago
Well let's get behind this thought (discussion) for a moment. In order to create "fiction" the concept has to come from a human. That person's ideas, concepts, philosophy (you get the picture) go into the "character." Next, the person bringing to life, the character is also putting their effort (energy) into the presentation. So, if we're actually talking about some kind of a distinction, then the difference should be: living or not, because fiction or non-fictional is very relavent to the nature of the discussion itself.
CaptainDunsel Pacificsun 6 months ago
Where I think we get into difficulty is if we celebrate the "achievements" of fictional characters. I don't think that applies in this case. But I can see it as a possibility in others.
Pacificsun CaptainDunsel 6 months ago
I totally agree. In fact recognition should always go back to the originator (living and breathing).
Mitchell 6 months ago
Who's going to tell them that's also a Hebrew gesture of benediction? :D
To answer your question: True. Not only is the answer true, but Leonard Nimoy who made the Jewish benediction symbol famous, was also of the Jewish faith. He was the one who invented the Vulcan Salute. The idea came to him from a memory he had as a child seeing this symbol in an Orthodox Jewish service, in Boston.
Yes, so in answer to Mitchell's question, a logical conclusion would be that the museum already knows.
+
Pacificsun Sway 6 months ago
Next, somebody's going to object to it for representing some religious significance. Maybe we shouldn't have shared the secret in public!
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